Are you a student? Like to program? Wanna make some money this summer? Then check out Fedora’s Summer Coding 2010!


poster explaining summer coding

The Fedora Summer Coding program connects students, mentors, sub-projects, and sponsors to provide coding opportunities as summer jobs.

Interested? All of the info can be found here https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Summer_Coding_2010

Students applications + proposals need to be in by the 20th of May

North Jersey Linux User Group Is doing A screening of “Revolution OS”


My buddy Murph and The New Jersey Linux User’s group would like to announce the presentation of the film “Revolution OS” at the Darress Theatre in Boonton NJ on Wednesday, March 31st 2010.

Revolution OS is a documentary detailing the roots of the Free Software and Open Source movements that resulted in Linux, as well as many other free software projects.

From the Revolution OS website:

REVOLUTION OS tells the inside story of the hackers who rebelled against the proprietary software model and Microsoft to create GNU/Linux and the Open Source movement.

On June 1, 2001, Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer said “Linux is a cancer that attaches itself in an intellectual property sense to everything it touches. “Microsoft fears GNU/Linux, and rightly so. GNU/Linux and the Open Source & Free Software movements arguably represent the greatest threat to Microsoft’s way of life. Shot in cinemascope on 35mm film in Silicon Valley, REVOLUTION OS tracks down the key movers and shakers behind Linux, and finds out how and why Linux became such a potent threat.

REVOLUTION OS features interviews with Linus Torvalds, Richard Stallman, Bruce Perens, Eric Raymond, Brian Behlendorf, Michael Tiemann, Larry Augustin, Frank Hecker, and Rob Malda.

The movie will be shown at 7:30 pm with a brief question and answer session afterward.

With the permission of the director, The showing is free of charge, but there will be a collection (amount of your choice) to cover the costs of the theatre. All additional proceeds will be donated to the Electronic Frontier Foundation and the Free Software Foundation.

Copies of various GNU/Linux distributions and other free software will be available at no charge after the showing as well.

If you plan on joining us, please RSVP with your name (no need for registration or email). We would like to have a rough idea of attendance. You do not need to RSVP to come. There will be enough room for everyone.

Any questions can be directed to BobM@NJlinux.org

MPAA wants to control your TV


Posted On: Mon, 2009-11-16 16:22 by holmesworcester to DefectiveByDesign.org

The MPAA is pressuring the FCC for the authority to cripple recording devices using so-called “Selectable Output Control” (SOC).

Basically, SOC would enable Hollywood to actually shut off the video outputs on your cable box, DVR, or other recording device when particular movies or shows come on. When the movie’s over, the outputs might turn back on. Your devices would dance to Hollywood’s tune.

Most cable boxes and DVRs already include Digital Restrictions Management (DRM) and operate using proprietary software — both of which we need to work to eliminate. But just because many of these devices already use DRM, that doesn’t mean we should let Hollywood and the FCC keep adding more. This new form of control would take even more freedom away from people using those devices, would restrict people using free software like MythTV to watch broadcasts and record them, and would set a dangerous precedent elevating Hollywood’s desires over the public’s freedom.

We’re not talking about an imaginary threat here. Hollywood has already tried this sort of nonsense with the Broadcast Flag — which the FCC rejected.

Who gets to decide which outputs you can use on your home entertainment gear — the movie studios or you? File a comment with the FCC and tell them to keep Hollywood’s restrictions out of your living room.

Please file a comment with the FCC. Before you follow the link, you may want to select and copy this sample text:

Dear Chairman Genachowski,

I urge you to deny the MPAA’s request seeking waiver of Section 76.1903 of the Commission’s rules. This waiver would allow studios to engage in “selectable output control,” or “SOC.” SOC would let Hollywood decide remotely which outputs I could use on the cable box and recording devices in my home. The waiver would take freedom away from people using these devices, would restrict people using free (as in freedom) software like MythTV to make and watch recordings, and would set a dangerous precedent against the public’s interest.

People have a basic right to not be controlled by the technology they use. Hollywood and set-top box manufacturers already violate this right by imposing Digital Restrictions Management (DRM) and proprietary software on the public. If you granted the waiver, you would be giving them even more power to trample on our rights.

Now that audio and video are a natural part of how people communicate, the ability to record, archive, share, and remix audio and video is essential to free speech, political debate and cultural participation. Hollywood and the MPAA are pushing these restrictions because they want a world where they are free to communicate with us, but where we cannot freely communicate with each other. The FCC represents the public, not Hollywood. Don’t give them more power to restrict our freedom to use media or to participate in politics and culture.

As I understand it, the FCC also considers things like convenience, affordability, and economic impact in making its decisions. Other people have presented you with persuasive evidence that SOC will needlessly inconvenience viewers, will unfairly require the purchase of new equipment in order to watch certain movies, and will raise the price of basic equipment. But these questions should not even be considered when the cost is the public’s freedom. Even if Hollywood does find a cost-effective and convenient way to enforce these restrictions, they should still be rejected.

I urge you to deny Hollywood’s waiver request.

Sincerely,

Update on FreeGeek-Richmond and Software Freedom Day


Well, I had my shindig pretty well planned out,and then I found out that the room we are moving FG-R into has a minor mold problem.  So we won’t have the room ready to go before September 19.  Which sucks but does not ruin my spirit.  So instead of getting the people to come to me I’m going to the people.  I will be up at the crack of dawn or so; on my feet or, on a bike riding throughout town with my SFD balloons attached to mysellf and my bike.  I’m gonna try to focus my efforts on WalMart and downtown.  So if you see me give me a friendly hong and hang out for a bit and get yourself an ubuntu cd.  I hope to be uploading media all day (wimax woot!) See you then!

Thoughts on RMS’ “How the Swedish Pirate Party Platform Backfires on Free Software”


I have just read RMS’ “How the Swedish Pirate Party Platform Backfires on Free Software” http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/pirate-party.html and I’m still formulating my opinion on this but in general I am ABSOLUTELY  against the way copyright is done currently.  When Copyright was introduced to America it was a “Creators Monopoly” and only lasted 14 years.  The originators thought that was more than ample time for you to create something,  make back the money that it cost you in creation, and fund you next idea.  I also think that is more than enough time.

No matter what DRM is evil and douchbaggary

More thoughts to come [as soon as I have them :)]

I really want to see @doctorow and @lessig weigh in on this 🙂